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Archive for the ‘Safety’ Category

Incident Reporting and Record Keeping

It is Gribbins policy that you report all incidents, accidents and near misses immediately.

All near misses, first aids, property damage incidents and injuries should be reported immediately to your foreman.  Once the foreman is aware of the incident they should contact one of the following within 30 minutes:

  • Trevor Atherton at 812-483-8049
  • Rick Jordan at 812-305-1801
  • Kent Kafka at 317-480-6252
  • Connor McCoy at 618-554-7348

Once the safety department is notified, the Area Manager should also be notified.

It is to the employee’s benefit to report these incidents immediately.   The employee can receive the medical care that is required to prevent increased severity of the injury and decrease pain and suffering.  One example of this is an eye injury:  if an employee feels like they have gotten something in their eye it needs to be reported immediately so they can get the appropriate first aid care to remove the debris.  This is an incident that if not taken care of immediately can cause more damage to the eye by the employee rubbing their eye or the debris becoming imbedded in the eye.  Another example would be lacerations that could become infected.  It is imperative that the laceration be cleaned out and antibiotics applied to prevent infection.  Another reason to report is that worker’s compensation requires the employee report the incident within the work shift that the injury occurs.  Also, when incidents and near misses are reported procedures or policies can be put in place to keep employees from being injured in the future from the same types of incidents.  If incidents are not reported immediately disciplinary action will be taken.

OSHA requires each contractor to use the OSHA 300 log to record each injury or illness during the year that meet the OSHA’s determination of a recordable, restricted duty or lost time accident.  At the end of the year the employer is required to fill out the OSHA 300A log and post it on each jobsite from February 1st thru April 30th of each year.  If OSHA conducts an inspection on your site during this time frame and the log is not onsite it results in an OSHA violation and a fine.  As long as you have this log in the back of your safety manual, you will be covered.  The log is also available here.  The password is required to access the page.  Contact the safety department for the password.

Report all incidents to your foreman or the safety department immediately!

Formaldehyde

Formaldehyde is a colorless, strong smelling gas often found in water based solutions.  Commonly used as a preservative in medical laboratories and mortuaries, formaldehyde is also found in many products such as chemicals, particle board, household products, glues, permanent press fabrics, paper product coatings, fiberboard and plywood.  It is also widely used as an industrial fungicide, germicide and disinfectant.  Mineral wool insulation contains 1% to 4% formaldehyde used as a binder.

Although the term formaldehyde describes various mixtures of formaldehyde, water and alcohol, the term “formalin” is used to describe a saturated solution of formaldehyde dissolved in water, typically with another agent, most commonly methanol, added to stabilize the solution.  Formalin is typically 37% formaldehyde by weight and 6 to 13% methanol by volume of water.  The formaldehyde component provides the disinfectant effects of formalin.

The OSHA Formaldehyde standard (29 CFR 1910.1048) and equivalent regulations in states with OSHA approved state plans protects workers exposed to formaldehyde and apply to all occupational exposures to formaldehyde from formaldehyde gas, its solutions and materials that release formaldehyde.  The permissible exposure limit (PEL) for formaldehyde in the workplace is 0.75 parts formaldehyde per million parts of air (0.75 ppm) measured over an 8 hour time weighted average (TWA).  The standard includes a second PEL in the form of a short term exposure limit (STEL) of 2 ppm which is the maximum exposure allowed during a 15 minute period.  The action level, which is the standard’s trigger for increased industrial hygiene monitoring and initiation of worker medical surveillance is 0.5 ppm when calculated as an 8 hour TWA.  Gribbins Insulation Company has conducted industrial hygiene sampling on employees working with formaldehyde with results ranging from less than 0.01 ppm to 0.05 ppm.

Formaldehyde is a sensitizing agent that can cause an immune system response upon initial exposure.  It is also a cancer hazard.  Acute exposure is highly irritating to the eyes, nose and throat and can make anyone exposed cough and wheeze.  Subsequent exposure may cause severe allergic reactions to the skin, eyes and respiratory tract.  Ingestion of formaldehyde can be fatal and long term exposure to low levels in the air or on the skin can cause asthma like respiratory problems and skin irritation such as dermatitis and itching.  Concentrations of 100 ppm are immediately dangerous to life and health. Workers can inhale formaldehyde as a gas or vapor or absorb it through the skin as a liquid.  They can be exposed during the treatment of textiles and the production of resins.  Airborne concentrations of formaldehyde above 0.1 ppm can cause irritation to the respiratory tract.  The severity of irritation intensifies as concentrations increase.

Provision of the OSHA standard requires employers to do the following:

  • Indentify all workers who may be exposed to formaldehyde at or above the action level or STEL through initial monitoring and determine their exposure.
  • Reassign workers who suffer significant adverse effects from exposure to jobs with significantly less or no exposure until their condition improves.  Reassignment may continue for up to 6 months until the worker is determined to be able to return to the original job or to be unable to return to work, whichever comes first.
  • Implement feasible engineering and work practice controls to reduce and maintain worker exposure to formaldehyde at or below the 8 hour TWA and the STEL.  If these controls cannot reduce exposure to or below the PELs, employers must provide workers with respirators.
  • Label all mixtures or solutions composed of greater than 0.1% formaldehyde and materials capable of releasing formaldehyde into the air at concentrations reaching or exceeding 0.1 ppm.  For all materials capable of releasing formaldehyde at levels above 0.5 ppm during normal use, the label must contain the words “potential cancer hazard.”
  • Train all workers exposed to formaldehyde concentrations of 0.1 ppm or greater at the time of initial job assignment and whenever a new exposure to formaldehyde is introduced into the work area.  Repeat training annually.
  • Select, provide and maintain appropriate personal protective equipment.  Ensure that workers use PPE such as impervious clothing, gloves, aprons and chemical splash goggles to prevent skin and eye contact.
  • Provide showers and eyewash stations if splashing is likely.
  • Provide medical surveillance for all workers exposed to formaldehyde at concentrations at or above the action level or exceeding the STEL, for those who develop signs and symptoms of overexposure, and for all workers exposed to formaldehyde in emergencies.

Knife Safety

Knives are a tool we use every day.  When used correctly they are very valuable, but when used incorrectly they become a very serious hazard.  Up to one-third of all hand tool injuries occur while using utility knives, and it only takes a second of inattention to become severely Gribbins Insulation - Toolbox Talkinjured.  The following are a list of safety rules to prevent injuries when using a utility knife:

  • Before beginning a task with a utility knife determine the correct blade for the task at hand by asking the following questions:  Is this the appropriate blade for the task?  What is the best type of blade edge for the task?  Is the handle of the knife large enough to have a secure grip?  Is the knife designed to reduce bending your wrist?
  • Always cut away from you body if possible.  To prevent laceration to yourself or others.
  • Be aware of where the knife will go if it accidentally slips.  Keep your other hand and fingers above the blade when cutting.  That way if the blade slips it will not lacerate your hand.
  • When not in use, store the knife with the blade retracted.  Do not leave a knife with the blade exposed on work surface, tool pouch or anywhere else.
  • Stay focused on the task at hand.  Do not be distracted by others working or talking around you.
  • Always use a sharp knife.  Sharper blades require less force and give you better control.  Some people think that a dull blade may be safer, but this is false.
  • Always secure material on a solid surface before cutting.  Do not try to cut materials while you are holding them.
  • Only use knives for their intended purpose, cutting.
  • Extend the blade only as far as need to cut through the material.  This will reduce the risk of breaking the blade.
  • If you drop your knife do not try to catch it.  Let it come to a complete stop before picking up.
  • Keep knives oiled and clean.
  • Only hold the knife by the handle.
  • Hand knives to others handle first, with the cutting edge away from you palm with the blade retracted.  Never throw knives to other employees.
  • Do not distract or startle someone who is using a knife.
  • Never point a knife at another employee.
  • Never chop or strike objects to try and cut them with a knife.
  • Clean your knife regularly and periodically lubricate.
  • Cut resistant or Kevlar gloves and safety glasses are required at all times while using utility knives.
  • A safety straight edge should be used whenever possible to reduce the risk of lacerations while using a utility knife.

Sprains and Strains – Prevention and Stretching

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According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics there are over 440,000 sprain and strain injuries each year.  With cooler temperatures, the muscles take longer to warm up, so it is imperative that employees take time each morning to stretch.  Proper lifting techniques and body mechanics also reduce the risk of these injuries from occurring.

Always use proper lifting techniques:

  •  Lift with your legs, not your back.
  • Size up the load before you lift.
  • Have a secure grip before lifting.
  • Do not twist you body when lifting.
  • Do not exceed your lifting capabilities.
  • Stop lifting immediately if you feel pain.
  • Do not lift heavy object above or away from you body.
  • Use mechanical lifting devices when possible.

Stretching lengthens muscles and tendons and allows muscles to generate more force around the joints, contract more efficiently and perform better.  The following are a list of recommended stretches to perform before beginning work.  Each stretch should be done for 20 to 30 seconds, it should be comfortable enough to hold for 10 seconds.

Back:

  • Bend slowly side to side
  • Place your hands on your lower back, bend your neck back and arch your back.
  • Place your legs together, slowly bend down and try to touch your toes.
  • Slowly twist your upper body side to side.

Legs/Knees:

  • Stand on one leg and reach behind your back and pull you foot up.
  • Spread your legs, bend down and try to touch the ground.

Shoulders:

  • Extend your arms and make a large, slow circular motion with your arms.  Forward then backwards.
  • Grab the opposite elbow and pull the elbow across your body.

Neck:

  • Make a slow circular motion by rotating your head clockwise and then counter clockwise.
  • Place your hand on one side of your head and use your neck muscle to push against your hand.  Then switch and push from the other direction.

 

Fall Protection Training

Duty to Have Fall Protection

Each employee on a walking/working surface 6 feet or more above a lower level where leading edges are under construction, but is not engaged in the leading edge work, shall be protected from falling by a guardrail system, safety net system, or personal fall arrest system.  Areas that require fall protection include, but are not limited to aerial lifts, scaffolds, ladders, leading edge work, pipe racks, working from ladders close to guardrails and roofs.  Gribbins Insulation adheres to a 100% fall protection rule.

Guardrails – must have vertical post spaced no more than 8 feet apart, top rails should be 42” above the walking/working surface plus or minus 3” and capable of withstanding 200 lbs, mid rails shall be installed half way between the top rail and platform and capable of withstanding 150 lbs of side force and toe boards shall be placed at floor level with no more than 1/2” opening and capable of withstand 50 lbs of side force.

Personal Fall Arrest System (PFAS) – consist of anchorage, connectors, lanyard, deceleration device, a life line and full body harness, all must have a tensile strength of at least 5000 lbs, you must comply with the manufacturer’s recommendations for proper use and design, fall protection equipment shall only be used for employee protection, any equipment subject to impact loading shall be immediately removed from service, all components of the PFAS should be compatible.  Full Body Harness – back d-ring shall be located in the middle of the back between the shoulder blades and leg straps shall be securely attached, harnesses are good for 5 years.  Shock Absorbing Lanyard – shock absorbing end shall be attached to the harness, shall not be connected to a retractable lanyard and unused legs of the lanyard shall not be attached back to the harness unless a specifically designed lanyard retainer is provided,  shall not be tied in knots, are good for 3 years.  Connectors – double locking snap hooks are required, only one snap hook shall be connected to a d-ring, never connect to snap hooks together, never connect the snap hook back to the lanyard unless specifically designed for that purpose and never connect a snap hook in which the snap hook will not fully close and lock.

Planning – Plan your fall protection system and how it will be used before starting your work.  Consider all factors that will affect your safety before, during and after a fall.  Anchorage Points – shall be capable of supporting at least 5,000 lbs, shall be independent of any anchorage being used to support or suspend platforms, guard rails are not an adequate anchorage point.  Free Fall – OSHA requires the maximum arresting force to be placed on an employee not to exceed 1,800 lbs to achieve this PFAS must be rigged so the potential free fall is never great than 6 ft, always tie off above you head.  Swing Falls – occur when the anchorage point is not directly above the point where a fall occurs, the force of strike an object may cause serious injury, review the specific requirement for your retractable, but work directly below the anchorage point as possible.  Fall Clearance – ensure adequate clearance exist in your path to prevent striking objects below, when using a 6 ft shock absorbing lanyard it is recommend you give yourself at least 18 ½ ft clearance below that is the distance it will take you to come to a complete stop, if you do not have that amount of clearance a self retracting lanyard must be used.  Sharp Edges – provide protection if lifelines or lanyards will come into contact with sharp edges.  Rescue – a rescue plan must be in place before a PFAS is used in case there is a fall rescue must occur within 15 minutes.

Inspection – PFAS shall be inspected prior to each use by the person using the equipment.  It should be inspected for tears, cuts, burns, abrasion, chemicals, date it is manufactured, discoloration or any other types of damage.  Tags shall also be inspected to ensure the date it is manufactured and serial number are legible.  If found to be defective on tags are not legible, it shall be immediately tagged and removed from service.  PFAS shall be inspected by a competent person at least quarterly.

Housekeeping

A clean jobsite with everything in its place is a safer job site. Good housekeeping improves every aspect of working including safety. It is easier to perform your work if you are not climbing over debris or always looking for misplaced materials or tools. Housekeeping completed once a week will not do the trick. Each individual has the responsibility to clean their work areas as they go.
Poor housekeeping can lead to many safety hazards including slips, trips and fall, punctures, falling debris, laceration, electric shock, rodents and chemical hazards just to name a few.

Gribbins Insulation - Toolbox TalkA list of housekeeping requirements:

  • Clean your work area as you work. Don’t let trash accumulate.
  • Areas shall be kept in a sanitary condition.
  • Floors shall be kept clear and dry.
  • Areas shall be free of loose boards, hole, protruding nails and splinters.
  • All extension cords, hoses, equipment, materials, debris, etc. shall be place out of walkways and off stairs.
  • Waste, trash, oily and used rags and other refuse shall be separated in provided containers.
  • Waste containers holding garbage, oily, flammable or hazardous waste shall be covered.
  • Garbage and other waste shall be disposed of at frequent regular intervals.
  • Materials that could become airborne shall be secured. This includes aluminum sheets or rolled, aluminum scraps, boxes or plywood.
  • Always return tools and equipment to proper storage location once you are finished with them. This makes it easier to find them and reduces the risk of them being damaged.
  • Food packaging or food scraps shall be placed in waste containers. Not just thrown on the floor.
  • Never run or leave extension cord near heat or water.
  • Do not stack boxes or materials where they can become unstable and fall.
  • All containers must be label as to their contents.
  • When you see a hazard, correct it if possible. If you cannot correct it, report it to your supervisor. Don’t wait for someone else to do it.

We have all seen or been on jobs where you must pay close attention to where you are stepping due to poor housekeeping. Make your job a safer job by performing good housekeeping.

Eye and Face Protection

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According to the National Institute for Occupation Safety and Health (NIOSH) approximately 2,000 eye injuries occur every day at work in the United States.  The construction industry has one of the highest rates.  OSHA requires eye and face protective equipment where there is a reasonable probability of preventing injury when such equipment is used.  Employers must provide a type of protector suitable for work to be performed, and employees must use the protectors.

Employees must make the necessary effort to keep their protective eyewear in good condition.  This includes cleaning and protecting your eyewear when not in use.  If your protective eyewear is inadequate to wear, turn it into your foreman for a new pair.

Employees will wear ANSI Z87.1 eye protection, at a minimum, at all times. Employees that require corrective spectacles will be required to wear approved side shields or goggles.

Foam lined safety glasses or goggles are types of eye protections that provides protection against dust and particles.  These are about the size and weight as normal safety glasses.  These fit tight to the face and have a foam gasket that presses against the employee’s face for seal.  This type of eye protection provides greater protection against dust and particles if worn correctly.

Foam lined safety glasses or goggles will be required whenever tearing off material, working in dust environments, working below other employee or with the following types of insulation and/or insulation that has the potential to enter the eye:

  • Cellular glass (foamglas)
  • Calcium silicate
  • Polyisocyanurate (urethane)
  • Perlite

A face shield and safety glasses are required when cutting or grinding with a Metabo or when shooting pins.

A welding hood with the proper filter lens is required when welding.

Report to your supervisor or the safety department immediately if you think something has entered your eye.  Usually the quicker the debris is removed from the eye, the better the outcome for the employee.  In the instance that debris does get into your eye the first thing to remember is not to rub your eye.  Rubbing your eye may cause further injury to your eye.  Try to let tears wash the debris out.  If tears do not get the debris out, try using eyewash.  If the debris is still in your eye, lift the upper eyelid outward and down over the lower lid.  If these techniques do not work keep your eye closed and report to your supervisor for further instruction.

Cold Related Illnesses & Injuries

Many construction jobs expose employees to cold temperatures during the winter months.  It important that employees know how to protect themselves, the signs and symptoms of cold related injuries or illnesses and what to do if they occur.  Cold related illnesses can slowly overcome a person who has been chilled.  The three factors to consider when determining if cold related injuries or illness could occur are low temperatures, wind speed and wetness.  The following are cold related illnesses and injuries and how workers can protect themselves.

Frostbite – Freezing in deep layers of the skin and tissue.   Skin becomes hard and numb and looks pale or waxy-white in color.  It usually affects the fingers, hands, toes, feet, ears and nose.

If frostbite occurs:  Move the person to a warm dry area, do not leave the person alone.  Remove any wet or tight clothing that may cut off blood flow to the affected area.  Do not rub the affected area (rubbing causes damage to the skin and tissue).  Gently place the affected area in warm water and monitoring the water temperature to slowly warm the tissue, do not pour warm water directly on the affect area (warming takes 25 to 40 minutes).  After the affected area has been warmed it may become puffy and blister, the affected area may have a burning feeling or numbness, when normal feeling, movement and skin color have returned, the affected area should be dried and wrapped to keep it warm.  If there is a chance the affected area may get cold again, do not warm the skin.  Seek medical attention as soon as possible.

Hypothermia – The normal body temperature (98.6 degrees F) drops to or below 95 degrees F.  Signs and symptoms include fatigue or drowsiness, uncontrolled shivering, cool bluish skin, slurred speech, clumsy movements or irritable, irrational or confused behavior.  If hypothermia occurs:  Call for emergency help immediately.   Move the person to a warm, dry area.  Do not leave the person alone.  Remove any wet clothing and replace with warm, dry clothing or wrap the person in blankets.  Have the person drink warm, sweet drinks, like sugar water or sport drinks, if they are alert.  Avoid drinks with caffeine, like coffee, tea or hot chocolate, or alcohol.  Have the person move their arms and legs to create muscle heat.  If they are unable to do this, place warm bottles or hot packs in the arm pits, groin, neck and head areas.  Do not rub the person’s body or place them in a warm water bath, this could cause the heart to stop.

Employees can protect themselves by:

  • Recognizing the environmental and workplace conditions that lead to potential cold-induced illnesses and injuries.
  • Learn the signs and symptoms or cold-induced illness/injuries and what to do to help the worker.
  • Select proper clothing for cold, wet and windy conditions.  Layer clothing to adjust to changing environmental temperatures.  Wear a hat and gloves, in addition to underwear that will keep water away from the skin.
  • Take frequent short breaks in warm dry shelters to allow the body to warm up.
  • Perform work during the warmest part of the day, if possible.
  • Avoid exhaustion or fatigue because energy is needed to keep muscles warm.
  • Use the buddy system.
  • Drink warm, sweet beverages, like sugar water or sport drinks.  Avoid drinks with caffeine, like coffee, tea or hot chocolate, or alcohol.
  • Eat warm, high calorie foods like hot pasta dishes.

Employees are at an increased risk when:

  • They have predisposing health condition such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and hypertension.
  • They take certain medication.  Check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacy and ask if any medicines you are taking affect you while working in cold environments.
  • They are in poor physical condition, have a poor diet, or are older.

Lockout – Tagout (LOTO) Training

Purpose

The purpose of the Lockout/Tagout procedure is to prevent the unexpected energization or startup of machines or equipment or release of stored energy that could cause injury to employees.   According to OSHA failure to control hazardous energy accounts for nearly 10% of serious accidents.

Hazardous Energy

Hazardous energy can be found during the maintenance and repairGribbins Insulation - Toolbox Talk of electrical equipment, vehicles and other equipment, routine lubrication of moving machine parts, sanitation or cleaning of machinery, clearing jammed equipment or machinery, removing existing insulation on line with heat tracing and maintenance of high-pressure, high temperature hazardous pipelines just to name a few.  There are many different types of hazardous energy including, but not limited to, electrical, pneumatic, hydraulic, mechanical, chemical and thermal.  Potential hazards that exist if equipment is not properly locked and tagged out include:  electric shock, fire and explosions, asphyxiation, amputations, caught in, chemical exposure or even death.

Procedures

Gribbins Insulation LOTO procedures are:  1. A person shall be designated to oversee and assure compliance with the LOTO procedures.  2. Before the procedure begins, a member of the safety department or designee will perform a final evaluation.  3. Turn off the point of operation controls.  4. Turn off the main power controls.  5. The designated person shall lock the equipment out and a danger tag shall be filled out and placed on the lock.  The tag and tie shall be securely attached and able to endure the environmental conditions at the worksite.  6. Test the switch or valve to make sure it cannot be turned “ON”.  7. Test the machine controls to make sure the main controls are really “OFF”.  8. When work is completed, the designated person shall remove the lock and danger tag and notify the proper person that the work is finished and equipment is operational.  The Gribbins Insulation Company LOTO procedure shall only be used if the jobsite does not already have a procedure in effect.  On many of these jobsite the owner will lock out the designated points and then the foreman will lock on to a group lockbox and place his key in a satellite lock box for other employees to lock on to.  In these cases, employees should walk down the lock out points to verify that everything has been locked out and the equipment is not operational.

General Rules

  • Locks and danger tags are to be used for all LOTO procedures
  • Make sure all energy sources are locked and tagged out, many machines have more than on power supply.
  • Never attempt to restart or reenergize any equipment or machinery without the consent of the designated person.
  • Danger tags shall be legible, understandable and include: the employees doing the job, the equipment locked out and the date of initiation and removal.
  • Tags are never to be removed without the authorization of the designated person. They are never to be bypassed, ignored, or otherwise defeated.
  • Employees may receive a false sense of security form tags. Tags warn and provide information to the employees.  They do not stop hazardous energy, the locks do.
  • If you feel as though a piece of equipment or machinery is not properly locked and tagged, stop work and inform the designated person immediately.

Excavation, Trenching, and Shoring

An excavation is any man made cut, cavity, trench or depression in the earth’s surface.  A trench is a narrow excavation made below the surface of the ground with a width not greater than 15 feet.

Excavations and trenches are areas where our work is normally not performed.  However, when we do perform in these areas, employees must be trained, a competent person must be onsite, and inspections must be completed.  Excavations and trenches are one of OSHA’s national emphasis program and continue to cause fatalities every year.  It is imperative that employees are trained and follow all rules and regulations while enter a trench or excavation.  The following are a list of safety precautions while working in or around trenches or excavations:

  • The area must be cleared, approved and a site specific safety plan must be completed by the Gribbins Insulation representative prior to the start of an excavation.  An excavation may be considered a confined space, therefore atmospheric testing may be required.
  • All excavations must have safe access ways, be properly barricaded and shall have a flashing light barricade at night.  Spoil dirt may be used to barricade one side of a ditch or similar excavation.  All dirt must be piled at least three feet back from the edge of an excavation and must be at least three feet high when used as a barricade.
  • All excavations four feet or deeper into which personnel may be allowed to enter, no matter how brief, shall be shored, benched and/or sloped to comply with OSHA requirements.
  • Access and egress ladders are required in any excavation at a minimum of every 25 feet of lateral travel per OSHA regulation.
  • Gribbins Insulation will have a competent person, as defined by OSHA, supervising all excavation work.  The competent person shall inspect the excavation daily before work begins and after significant amount of rain or other conditions that may increase hazards.  The competent person shall complete annual refresher training.
  • All soils are to be considered Class “C” unless a soil laboratory determines and documents otherwise.
  • All excavations shall be inspected daily using the Gribbins Insulation Excavation Inspection form.
  • All walkways over a trench/excavation shall have guardrails, if they are 6 feet or more above the bottom of the trench/exaction.
  • All adjacent structures shall be supported to prevent a collapse.
  • Check all excavation walls before entering and after a heavy rain or thaw.  Inspect shoring daily or more often in extremely wet weather.
  • Nobody is permitted in an excavation while equipment is being used next to the edge.
  • All excavations within three feet of a known active underground pipeline, conduit, or cable shall be hand probed and dug using insulated tools.  If the underground utility cannot be found, all work shall stop at this location and the Gribbins Insulation field representative shall be notified.
  • No employee is permitted to enter a trench or excavation without being properly trained.

President’s Message

Q4 2017 Safety Star Winners

Posted: 02/02/18 By: Megan Knoll, Dir of Marketing

Announcing our final safety star winners from 2017!

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Safety STARS!

Posted: 01/16/18 By: admin

Announcing our Safety STAR winners from the 3rd quarter of 2017

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Toolbox Talk

Incident Reporting and Record Keeping

Posted: 01/29/18 By: Trevor Atherton, Safety Mgr

Report all incidents to your foreman or the safety department immediately!

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Formaldehyde

Posted: 01/22/18 By: Trevor Atherton, Safety Mgr

Formaldehyde is a highly toxic agent that should be handled with extreme caution. OSHA encourages employers to follow standard requirements in order to maintain the safest work environment.

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